About Us
Contact
ANNUAL REPORT
FILING SERVICE
PROCEDURE
1

Insert your record id and add your contact information

2

Complete a simple questionnaire that will be sent to you via email

3

Sign the form and we will process your Annual Report

What is an Annual Report?

After a business is created, most states require you to submit an annual report to keep your entity in an active state. Its main purpose is to provide the Business Division of the Secretary of State, updated information about your entity. Throughout a business entity’s life, many changes can occur. For example, a corporation’s owners, managers, registered agents, principal addresses and mailing addresses are part of information that will need to be updated in an annual report. If all your entity’s info has not changed from the previous year, you are still required to file the annual report, so the Secretary of State knows that your information is up to date. Annual reports vary from state to state including its fees, due dates and information required information.

Why is it Important?

By filing an Annual Report, you are advising the Secretary of State that your entity’s information is up to date. The Secretary of State may notify your company of issues surrounding any filing and/or the filing of any lawsuit naming your company as a party which has been served upon. If the Secretary of State cannot find your company because the address has not been updated, you run the risk of not knowing that such a lawsuit has been filed.

What Happens if You Don’t File?

If you do not file an annual report in a timely manner, the Secretary of State can administratively dissolve your company. Once, administratively dissolved, your company is no longer in good standing with the state, though it may still be sued. If your company is no longer in good standing, company business may be slowed because potential creditors or buyers may refuse to do business with a company that is not in good standing. If an administrative dissolution does occur, you must file the delinquent annual report(s) as well as an application to reinstate with the Secretary of State, which carries a filing fee as well. Most states will also require a late fee to be paid along with the delinquent annual report(s).

No longer in business?

Unfortunately, not all businesses succeed but its part of entrepreneurship. If your corporation is no longer operating, then you need to file a business dissolution. When you dissolve your entity, you are letting the Secretary of State know that you wish to no longer do business.

What is An EIN?

An Employer Identification Number (EIN), Federal Employer Identification Number (FEIN), or Federal Tax Identification Number (FTIN), is like a Social Security Number (SSN) for your business. The EIN number allows the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to identify taxpayers and keep track of a business’s tax reporting.

Need An EIN?

When filing an Annual Report, some states require you to enter your Employer Identification Number (EIN). This information is then posted with state's business information on the Secretary of States database.

Apply For an EIN

Annual Report State Deadlines

State Corporation LLC
Alabama C corps: 15th day of fourth month after beginning of tax year. S corps: 15th day of 3rd month after beginning of tax year. Initial report required within 2.5 months of formation. 15th day of 3rd month after beginning of tax year. Initial report required within 2.5 months of formation.
Alaska Biennially – January 2nd (Nonprofits – July 2nd). Initial report required within 6 months of formation. Biennially – January 2nd. Initial report required within 6 months of formation.
Arizona Anniversary – exact day No report
Arkansas May 1st (Nonprofits – August 1st) May 1st
California Anniversary – end of month Biennially – end of anniversary month
Colorado Within a 3-month period starting the 1st day of anniversary month, ending the last day of 3rd month. Within a 3-month period starting the 1st day of anniversary month, ending the last day of 3rd month.
Connecticut Anniversary – end of month. Initial report required within 30 days of formation. January 1st to March 31st
Delaware Domestic corporations: March 1st Foreign corporations: June 30th June 1st
District of Columbia Biennially. April 1st Biennially. April 1st
Florida May 1st May 1st
Georgia April 1st. Initial report required within 90 days of formation. April 1st
Hawaii Anniversary – end of quarter filed in Anniversary – end of quarter filed in
Idaho Anniversary – end of month Anniversary – end of month
Illinois Prior to the first day of the anniversary month Prior to the first day of the anniversary month
Indiana Biennially – last day of month of formation Biennially – last day of month of formation
Iowa Biennially. April 1st on even years Biennially. April 1st on odd years
Kansas 15th day of 4th month after end of fiscal year (typically April 15th) 15th day of 4th month after end of fiscal year (typically April 15th)
Kentucky June 30th June 30th
Louisiana Anniversary – exact day Anniversary – exact day
Maine June 1st June 1st
Maryland April 15th April 15th
Massachusetts March 15th Anniversary – exact date
Michigan May 15th Feb. 15th
Minnesota December 31st December 31st
Mississippi April 15th April 15th
Missouri 3 months after anniversary month ending. Initial report required within 30 days of formation. No report
Montana April 15th April 15th
Nebraska Biennially. March 1st on even years Biennially. April 1st on odd years
Nevada Anniversary – end of month Initial report due within 30 days of filing Anniversary – end of month Initial report due within 30 days of filing
New Hampshire April 1st April 1st
New Jersey Last day of anniversary month Last day of anniversary month
New Mexico Biennially – 15th day of 4th month after end of fiscal year (typically April 15th). Initial report due within 30 days of formation No report
New York Biennially – end of anniversary month Biennially – end of anniversary month
North Carolina 15th day of 4th month after tax year end (typically April 15th) April 15th
North Dakota Domestic: August 1st. Foreign: May 15th November 15th
Ohio No report unless a professional corporation (biennially – July 1st of even years) No report
Oklahoma Business activity tax return (for C and S corps): July 1st Anniversary – exact day.
Oregon Anniversary – exact date Anniversary – exact date
Pennsylvania Every 10 years – end of year Every 10 years – end of year
Rhode Island March 1st November 1st
South Carolina Report included on tax return (C corps due April 15th or 15th day of 4th month after tax year end) No report
South Dakota Anniversary – end of month Anniversary – end of month
Tennessee April 1st or 1st day of 4th month after tax year end April 1st or 1st day of 4th month after tax year end
Texas May 15th May 15th
Utah Anniversary – exact date Anniversary – exact date
Vermont March 15th March 31st
Virginia Anniversary – last day of month Anniversary – last day of month
Washington Anniversary – last day of month. Initial report due within 120 days of formation. Anniversary – last day of month. Initial report due within 120 days of formation.
West Virginia July 1st July 1st
Wisconsin Domestic: Anniversary – by the last day of the quarter filed in Foreign: March 31st Domestic: Anniversary – by the last day of the quarter filed in Foreign: March 31st
Wyoming Anniversary – first day of the month Anniversary – first day of the month
Puerto Rico April 15th April 15th

GET PRODUCT UPDATES

Stay connected by signing up to our entity update service!

© 2024 Powered by Annual Corp All Rights Reserved